Title

The Effect of Corrugation Widths of Steel Sheets on Sound Insulation of Trumpet Frequencies

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Physics

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Sound insulation is important in musical settings, where volume is highly important, and other settings where excessive noise can lead to hearing loss and other complications. With differences in inherent sound insulation, certain materials are preferred in certain settings based on the needs of the environment. Steel has long since been considered a poor sound insulator; the only focus of contemporary research being the composite structures where the use of steel is necessary due to structural needs. Due to the common nature of steel, investigation is needed as to how to potentially improve the sound insulation of an object that finds such common use. The purpose of this study was to determine if the presence of corrugation, and the adjustments of distance between peaks and valleys of the corrugation, could lead to any change in sound insulation. It was hypothesized that the corrugated sheet with the largest distance between the peaks, 7.62 cm, would have the lowest transmitted amplitude due to having the highest mass. An adaptation of the two-room method was used: the sound initiator was isolated on one side of the sheet in question, and the sound amplitude was measured on the other side of the surface. The results of a one-way ANOVA test indicated no significance in the results, F(2, 267) = 1.12, p = 0.33. As a result, it was concluded that there was no significant difference between the sound insulation of the flat steel sheet and either of the corrugated sheets.

Location

ECL 116

Start Date

3-25-2023 10:00 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 25th, 10:00 AM

The Effect of Corrugation Widths of Steel Sheets on Sound Insulation of Trumpet Frequencies

ECL 116

Sound insulation is important in musical settings, where volume is highly important, and other settings where excessive noise can lead to hearing loss and other complications. With differences in inherent sound insulation, certain materials are preferred in certain settings based on the needs of the environment. Steel has long since been considered a poor sound insulator; the only focus of contemporary research being the composite structures where the use of steel is necessary due to structural needs. Due to the common nature of steel, investigation is needed as to how to potentially improve the sound insulation of an object that finds such common use. The purpose of this study was to determine if the presence of corrugation, and the adjustments of distance between peaks and valleys of the corrugation, could lead to any change in sound insulation. It was hypothesized that the corrugated sheet with the largest distance between the peaks, 7.62 cm, would have the lowest transmitted amplitude due to having the highest mass. An adaptation of the two-room method was used: the sound initiator was isolated on one side of the sheet in question, and the sound amplitude was measured on the other side of the surface. The results of a one-way ANOVA test indicated no significance in the results, F(2, 267) = 1.12, p = 0.33. As a result, it was concluded that there was no significant difference between the sound insulation of the flat steel sheet and either of the corrugated sheets.