Title

An Archaeological Analysis of the Fort Fredrick Heritage Preserve House Site

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Sociology

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

Fort Frederick neat Port Royal, SC was where the Emancipation Proclamation was first read publicly in the Confederacy. However, that is not the only thing that makes this fort important to American history. Fort Frederick is a structure made of tabby, a combination of oyster shells lime, and sand that acts similarly to concrete. It is hard to replicate today. The tabby construction was part of the reason this site was given to the SCDNR Heritage Trust. On this site, though, there was another tabby house site discovered under an existing road. This site appears on no maps of the area and is not mentioned in historical records. Our research analyzed the material found at this house site to understand who lived in this house and when. This process included washing, rough sorting, and then cataloging the artifacts gathered from the site. There was a greater than normal amount of cultural material found at this site making it harder to know who lived there or even when they lived there. Through analysis of the material, we have found that this was likely a slave house or possibly even two separate structures whose imprints on the land overlapped. We have also been able to produce theories as to what role in the enslaved hierarchy (whether they worked as cooks, field hands, etc.) the residents of this site played.

Location

ECL 340

Start Date

3-25-2023 12:15 PM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

Yes

COinS
 
Mar 25th, 12:15 PM

An Archaeological Analysis of the Fort Fredrick Heritage Preserve House Site

ECL 340

Fort Frederick neat Port Royal, SC was where the Emancipation Proclamation was first read publicly in the Confederacy. However, that is not the only thing that makes this fort important to American history. Fort Frederick is a structure made of tabby, a combination of oyster shells lime, and sand that acts similarly to concrete. It is hard to replicate today. The tabby construction was part of the reason this site was given to the SCDNR Heritage Trust. On this site, though, there was another tabby house site discovered under an existing road. This site appears on no maps of the area and is not mentioned in historical records. Our research analyzed the material found at this house site to understand who lived in this house and when. This process included washing, rough sorting, and then cataloging the artifacts gathered from the site. There was a greater than normal amount of cultural material found at this site making it harder to know who lived there or even when they lived there. Through analysis of the material, we have found that this was likely a slave house or possibly even two separate structures whose imprints on the land overlapped. We have also been able to produce theories as to what role in the enslaved hierarchy (whether they worked as cooks, field hands, etc.) the residents of this site played.