Title

Using Electromyography and Biomedical Engineering to Assist Muscular Atrophy Patients

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

Patients with Muscular Atrophy disorders such as Spinal Muscular Atrophy suffer from decreased muscular capacity making complex motor functions such as walking or eating difficult. However, these muscular weaknesses do not always fully destroy the muscles. By using Electromyography, it could be possible to detect if a patient is trying to use one of these weaker muscles by measuring the amount of voltage the nervous system and brain is sending to the muscle. This study was conducted to test if it was possible to record muscle flexion data in a patient with a Muscular Atrophy disorder. Data was recorded with a Sichiray Muscle Sensor and an Arduino Uno with numerical results measured in microvolts (µV) displayed on a computer monitor in real time. Our results found that our patient with Spinal Muscular Atrophy Type 3 (a type of Muscular Atrophy) could cause a significant enough shift in the amount of microvolts to be recorded. When compared to a patient without muscular Atrophy the recorded difference in voltage shift was negligible. However we also found that our sensor seemed to only function in a limited range regardless of being used on a person with or without Muscular Atrophy meaning further testing with better equipment and larger sample sizes would be required. However, if what these findings suggest is true then major advancements in bionics and quality of life for Muscular Atrophy patients could be made.

Location

ECL 340

Start Date

3-25-2023 12:30 PM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 25th, 12:30 PM

Using Electromyography and Biomedical Engineering to Assist Muscular Atrophy Patients

ECL 340

Patients with Muscular Atrophy disorders such as Spinal Muscular Atrophy suffer from decreased muscular capacity making complex motor functions such as walking or eating difficult. However, these muscular weaknesses do not always fully destroy the muscles. By using Electromyography, it could be possible to detect if a patient is trying to use one of these weaker muscles by measuring the amount of voltage the nervous system and brain is sending to the muscle. This study was conducted to test if it was possible to record muscle flexion data in a patient with a Muscular Atrophy disorder. Data was recorded with a Sichiray Muscle Sensor and an Arduino Uno with numerical results measured in microvolts (µV) displayed on a computer monitor in real time. Our results found that our patient with Spinal Muscular Atrophy Type 3 (a type of Muscular Atrophy) could cause a significant enough shift in the amount of microvolts to be recorded. When compared to a patient without muscular Atrophy the recorded difference in voltage shift was negligible. However we also found that our sensor seemed to only function in a limited range regardless of being used on a person with or without Muscular Atrophy meaning further testing with better equipment and larger sample sizes would be required. However, if what these findings suggest is true then major advancements in bionics and quality of life for Muscular Atrophy patients could be made.