Title

The Effect of Chlorpheniramine Maleate on the bioluminescence of Vibrio fischeri

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

COVID-19 has accelerated the consumption of many over-the-counter cold medicines to alleviate symptoms. The rapid increase in consumption together with the improper disposal of drugs has polluted the environment with pharmaceuticals thereby negatively impacting microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to determine if Vibrio fischeri, a common aquatic bacteria, is affected by antihistamine chlorpheniramine maleate commonly taken to treat cold and flu-like symptoms. The experiment consisted of three groups of Vibrio, each with 10 petri dishes containing 3 bacteria cultures each. After being cultured and measuring initial stats, each group received different doses of CPM and were left to sit for 18 hours. It was hypothesized that the Vibrio fishceri cultures exposed to higher concentrations of chlorpheniramine maleate would produce less bioluminescence and decrease in light intensity and therefore, show a decline in health. The results show that the drug concentrations in both experimental groups negatively affected the bacteria. The inferential t-test ran on the data found it to be statistically significant meaning the null was rejected and the alternative experimental hypothesis was accepted. This data suggests that chlorpheniramine maleate plays a role in the decline of Vibrio fischeri’s health, suggesting the idea that pharmaceutical pollution is a big threat to living organisms unless major steps are adopted to dispose of drugs and medications without impacting the environment.

Location

BS 349

Start Date

3-25-2023 11:00 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 25th, 11:00 AM

The Effect of Chlorpheniramine Maleate on the bioluminescence of Vibrio fischeri

BS 349

COVID-19 has accelerated the consumption of many over-the-counter cold medicines to alleviate symptoms. The rapid increase in consumption together with the improper disposal of drugs has polluted the environment with pharmaceuticals thereby negatively impacting microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to determine if Vibrio fischeri, a common aquatic bacteria, is affected by antihistamine chlorpheniramine maleate commonly taken to treat cold and flu-like symptoms. The experiment consisted of three groups of Vibrio, each with 10 petri dishes containing 3 bacteria cultures each. After being cultured and measuring initial stats, each group received different doses of CPM and were left to sit for 18 hours. It was hypothesized that the Vibrio fishceri cultures exposed to higher concentrations of chlorpheniramine maleate would produce less bioluminescence and decrease in light intensity and therefore, show a decline in health. The results show that the drug concentrations in both experimental groups negatively affected the bacteria. The inferential t-test ran on the data found it to be statistically significant meaning the null was rejected and the alternative experimental hypothesis was accepted. This data suggests that chlorpheniramine maleate plays a role in the decline of Vibrio fischeri’s health, suggesting the idea that pharmaceutical pollution is a big threat to living organisms unless major steps are adopted to dispose of drugs and medications without impacting the environment.