Title

Testing Seawall Design on Decreasing Land Scour and Improving Resiliency Against Tsunamis

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Tsunamis can damage infrastructure and facilities and cause injuries. Coastal areas are highly vulnerable to wave impacts. Coastal protection facilities serve to reduce this impact and redirect the force. In this research experiment, seawalls designs were modified to vertical, sloped, and domed in shape to reduce land deterioration and wave overtopping. A coastal environment was replicated in a tank with a wave generator, set at 10 volts, along with the seawall installed in the sand above sea level. It was hypothesized that the vertical seawall would be an ineffective seawall design while the sloped seawall design would reduce scour the most. Vertical seawalls were regarded to be ineffective due to its inability to reduce wave overtopping. It is also unable to prevent concentrated water pressure distribution towards the structure's lower levels. The sand accumulated at the end of each trial were a measure of its ability to prevent land scour. Data were analyzed through a chi-squared goodness of fit test with a 95% confidence interval. It was determined that the land scour resulting from the seawalls were statistically significant. It was found that x²cdf(1.6595, 10^99, 6) = 0.94820, p>.05. Therefore, the null hypothesis failed to be rejected. It was concluded that seawalls follow the expected distribution patterns of the land scour resulting from waves. Through a comparative analysis of the different walls, however, it was determined that the domed seawall was the most effective in reducing land scour and provided the most protection against soil liquefaction.

Location

BS 355

Start Date

3-25-2023 11:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 25th, 11:45 AM

Testing Seawall Design on Decreasing Land Scour and Improving Resiliency Against Tsunamis

BS 355

Tsunamis can damage infrastructure and facilities and cause injuries. Coastal areas are highly vulnerable to wave impacts. Coastal protection facilities serve to reduce this impact and redirect the force. In this research experiment, seawalls designs were modified to vertical, sloped, and domed in shape to reduce land deterioration and wave overtopping. A coastal environment was replicated in a tank with a wave generator, set at 10 volts, along with the seawall installed in the sand above sea level. It was hypothesized that the vertical seawall would be an ineffective seawall design while the sloped seawall design would reduce scour the most. Vertical seawalls were regarded to be ineffective due to its inability to reduce wave overtopping. It is also unable to prevent concentrated water pressure distribution towards the structure's lower levels. The sand accumulated at the end of each trial were a measure of its ability to prevent land scour. Data were analyzed through a chi-squared goodness of fit test with a 95% confidence interval. It was determined that the land scour resulting from the seawalls were statistically significant. It was found that x²cdf(1.6595, 10^99, 6) = 0.94820, p>.05. Therefore, the null hypothesis failed to be rejected. It was concluded that seawalls follow the expected distribution patterns of the land scour resulting from waves. Through a comparative analysis of the different walls, however, it was determined that the domed seawall was the most effective in reducing land scour and provided the most protection against soil liquefaction.