Title

Comparison of the Combined and Individual Effects of Diphenhydramine on the Mortality rate of Daphnia magna when Co-exposed with Petrol-based Microplastics, and Cellulose-based Microplastics.

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Considering the persistence and prevalence of plastics in the environment, specifically in aquatic ecosystems, investigation into the effects of co-exposure of organisms to plastics and various pollutants is essential. Microplastics (MPs) are microscopic pieces of plastic that have been identified in all bodies of water and in the air. Biodegradable plastics have been found to be unable to biodegrade in most environmental conditions, and can also break down into microbioplastics (MBPs) in the environment. Polymer adsorption is a process that allows a microplastic to carry increased amounts of a pollutant into the body of an organism when ingested, potentially increasing the effects of these pollutants. Diphenhydramine is one of the most commonly identified over-the-counter medicines in bodies of water around the world, and is traditionally used to treat insomnia in humans. Previous literature used concentrations of around 250μ/L of Diphenhydramine, and around 10 mg/L of microplastics to test the effects of these pollutants individually on Daphnia magna. This study used six solutions containing varying presences of MPS, MBPS, and Diphenhydramine, and measured mortality over a 96 hour experimentation period. The mortality rate in the six solutions: Control, Diphenhydramine, Microplastics, Microbioplastics, MPS+D, and MBPS+D were 23.33%, 50%, 26.67%, 33.33%, 63.33% and 63.33% respectively, and a two-way ANOVA test was conducted to determine the statistical significance of each mortality rate. With a p-value of 0.05, it was determined that the two combined solutions containing MPS & D, and MBPS & D, were found to have statistically significant effects on mortality.

Location

BS 349

Start Date

3-25-2023 10:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 25th, 10:45 AM

Comparison of the Combined and Individual Effects of Diphenhydramine on the Mortality rate of Daphnia magna when Co-exposed with Petrol-based Microplastics, and Cellulose-based Microplastics.

BS 349

Considering the persistence and prevalence of plastics in the environment, specifically in aquatic ecosystems, investigation into the effects of co-exposure of organisms to plastics and various pollutants is essential. Microplastics (MPs) are microscopic pieces of plastic that have been identified in all bodies of water and in the air. Biodegradable plastics have been found to be unable to biodegrade in most environmental conditions, and can also break down into microbioplastics (MBPs) in the environment. Polymer adsorption is a process that allows a microplastic to carry increased amounts of a pollutant into the body of an organism when ingested, potentially increasing the effects of these pollutants. Diphenhydramine is one of the most commonly identified over-the-counter medicines in bodies of water around the world, and is traditionally used to treat insomnia in humans. Previous literature used concentrations of around 250μ/L of Diphenhydramine, and around 10 mg/L of microplastics to test the effects of these pollutants individually on Daphnia magna. This study used six solutions containing varying presences of MPS, MBPS, and Diphenhydramine, and measured mortality over a 96 hour experimentation period. The mortality rate in the six solutions: Control, Diphenhydramine, Microplastics, Microbioplastics, MPS+D, and MBPS+D were 23.33%, 50%, 26.67%, 33.33%, 63.33% and 63.33% respectively, and a two-way ANOVA test was conducted to determine the statistical significance of each mortality rate. With a p-value of 0.05, it was determined that the two combined solutions containing MPS & D, and MBPS & D, were found to have statistically significant effects on mortality.