Title

The Effect of Temperature on the Growth of Pseudomonas sp. and Penicillium sp. When Grown Using Motor Oil as a Source of Nutrients

Author(s)

Grayson B. Byrd

School Name

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Microbiology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

The purpose of this experiment is to determine the effect of temperature on the growth of Pseudomonas sp. and Penicillium sp. when grown using motor oil as a source of nutrients. First all of the materials needed were gathered. The bacteria and fungus were grown in an incubator at the recommended temperature while in a test tube of nutrient broth. After they grew for two weeks, thirty six test tubes were filled with two milliliters of oil and seven milliliters of water. A pipet was used to transfer one milliliter of nutrient broth/bacteria mixture to eighteen of the test tubes. One milliliter of nutrient broth/fungus mixture was added to the rest of the test tubes using a different pipet. Three sets of twelve containing six bacteria and six fungus test tubes were separated and put into three different climates: cold, room temperature, and hot. They were left to grow using the oil as a source of nutrients for two weeks. After these two weeks bacteria and fungus had grown directly underneath the layer of oil at the top of the water. The amount of growth was measured in millimeters for each test tube. The results of the experiment showed that in each of the climates the average growth of the two microorganisms were different than the microorganisms in the other climates. In conclusion, the results supported the null hypothesis, stating there will be no difference in growth in any of the climates, to be rejected.

Start Date

4-11-2015 11:30 AM

End Date

4-11-2015 11:45 AM

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 11:30 AM Apr 11th, 11:45 AM

The Effect of Temperature on the Growth of Pseudomonas sp. and Penicillium sp. When Grown Using Motor Oil as a Source of Nutrients

The purpose of this experiment is to determine the effect of temperature on the growth of Pseudomonas sp. and Penicillium sp. when grown using motor oil as a source of nutrients. First all of the materials needed were gathered. The bacteria and fungus were grown in an incubator at the recommended temperature while in a test tube of nutrient broth. After they grew for two weeks, thirty six test tubes were filled with two milliliters of oil and seven milliliters of water. A pipet was used to transfer one milliliter of nutrient broth/bacteria mixture to eighteen of the test tubes. One milliliter of nutrient broth/fungus mixture was added to the rest of the test tubes using a different pipet. Three sets of twelve containing six bacteria and six fungus test tubes were separated and put into three different climates: cold, room temperature, and hot. They were left to grow using the oil as a source of nutrients for two weeks. After these two weeks bacteria and fungus had grown directly underneath the layer of oil at the top of the water. The amount of growth was measured in millimeters for each test tube. The results of the experiment showed that in each of the climates the average growth of the two microorganisms were different than the microorganisms in the other climates. In conclusion, the results supported the null hypothesis, stating there will be no difference in growth in any of the climates, to be rejected.