Title

Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Decrease Viability and Produce Morphological Aberrations in Early Chicken Development

School Name

Academic Magnet High School

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Zoology

Presentation Type

Mentored

Written Paper Award

1st Place

Abstract

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs] are commonly consumed by the general population for their therapeutic effects in relieving fever, pain, and inflammation. However, NSAID consumption by pregnant women in their third trimester has been correlated to birth defects in their newborn children. The purpose of this study is to determine if NSAIDs cause abnormalities in morphogenesis. Using the whole embryo culture technique with the chicken model system, the researcher administered varying doses of ibuprofen to approximately stage HH14-16 chick embryos and then scored general morphological characteristics of the embryos after 18-20 hours of culture. Ibuprofen was tested at four doses: one dose that proportionally would be fatal to humans and three sub-lethal doses equivalent to the maximum concentration of ibuprofen in the human bloodstream after consuming an 800 mg, 400 mg, or 200 mg dose. Both the lethal dose and the 800 mg equivalent dose caused significant reduction of viability of the embryos, with severe bleeding and blood pooling in the cardiac regions and several morphological aberrations. The 400 mg and 200 mg equivalent doses did not result in such a reduction of viability, although blood pooling was observed in some cultures given the 400 mg equivalent dose. Embryos receiving the 200 mg equivalent dose appeared morphologically normal. Proteomic analysis of the cardiac tissues will be conducted using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. Results from this study could have implications on the safety of ibuprofen for child-bearing aged women that have not been appreciated previously.

Start Date

4-11-2015 11:15 AM

End Date

4-11-2015 11:30 AM

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 11:15 AM Apr 11th, 11:30 AM

Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Decrease Viability and Produce Morphological Aberrations in Early Chicken Development

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs] are commonly consumed by the general population for their therapeutic effects in relieving fever, pain, and inflammation. However, NSAID consumption by pregnant women in their third trimester has been correlated to birth defects in their newborn children. The purpose of this study is to determine if NSAIDs cause abnormalities in morphogenesis. Using the whole embryo culture technique with the chicken model system, the researcher administered varying doses of ibuprofen to approximately stage HH14-16 chick embryos and then scored general morphological characteristics of the embryos after 18-20 hours of culture. Ibuprofen was tested at four doses: one dose that proportionally would be fatal to humans and three sub-lethal doses equivalent to the maximum concentration of ibuprofen in the human bloodstream after consuming an 800 mg, 400 mg, or 200 mg dose. Both the lethal dose and the 800 mg equivalent dose caused significant reduction of viability of the embryos, with severe bleeding and blood pooling in the cardiac regions and several morphological aberrations. The 400 mg and 200 mg equivalent doses did not result in such a reduction of viability, although blood pooling was observed in some cultures given the 400 mg equivalent dose. Embryos receiving the 200 mg equivalent dose appeared morphologically normal. Proteomic analysis of the cardiac tissues will be conducted using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. Results from this study could have implications on the safety of ibuprofen for child-bearing aged women that have not been appreciated previously.