Title

Optical Probes For Noninvasive Molecular Imaging Of Cancer Biomarkers In Glioblastoma Cell Lines

Author(s)

Faith Mitchell

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Cell and Molecular Biology

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Steven Ornstein, Department of Biology, Medical University of South Carolina

Abstract

We designed and created non-invasive, near infra-red (NIR) optical imaging probes targeted to specific biomarkers in Glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines. Through western blot analysis, specific proteins were observed to be consistently overexpressed in the GBM cell lines. These unique biomarkers include: transferrin receptor (Tfr) proteins, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) proteins, and platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFr) proteins. Probes were created out of short peptides with ends complimentary to the amino acid sequence on the binding site of each respective protein receptor. A fluorescent dye (Dylight- 680) was attached to the free amine group of each peptide. We observed and quantified the uptake of these conjugates through fluorescent microscopy in an effort to optimize the efficiency of the treatments in preparation for use in vivo.

Start Date

4-11-2015 11:15 AM

End Date

4-11-2015 11:30 AM

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 11:15 AM Apr 11th, 11:30 AM

Optical Probes For Noninvasive Molecular Imaging Of Cancer Biomarkers In Glioblastoma Cell Lines

We designed and created non-invasive, near infra-red (NIR) optical imaging probes targeted to specific biomarkers in Glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines. Through western blot analysis, specific proteins were observed to be consistently overexpressed in the GBM cell lines. These unique biomarkers include: transferrin receptor (Tfr) proteins, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) proteins, and platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFr) proteins. Probes were created out of short peptides with ends complimentary to the amino acid sequence on the binding site of each respective protein receptor. A fluorescent dye (Dylight- 680) was attached to the free amine group of each peptide. We observed and quantified the uptake of these conjugates through fluorescent microscopy in an effort to optimize the efficiency of the treatments in preparation for use in vivo.