Title

The effect of Cyclops copepod predation on the promotion of growth within Microcystis aeruginosa populations through chemical signaling

Author(s)

Sachet Urs, SVHS

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Microbiology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Harmful cyanobacterial blooms are a major threat to the world and need to be studied and researched more carefully. This research is aimed towards finding out if the predation of cyanobacteria actually causes more harm than good. There were three groups of 15 dishes that were all filled with 200 mL of distilled water. Cloth boundaries were made to split each dish in half(side A and side B) and they were hot glued to the glass. Each of the dishes contained 4 mL of Microcystis aeruginosa in both side A and side B. One group of dishes contained 4 mL of Cyclops copepods in side A, another group contained 6 mL of copepods in side A, and the last group contained no copepods at all. Five cyanobacteria diameters were measured and recorded from each dish over the course of four days. An ANOVA [F(2, 177)= 84.10, p<0.001] indicates there was a significant difference between the amount of copepods added and the cyanobacteria cell diameters. The 4 mL of copepods group had a noticeably larger average cyanobacteria diameter than the control group and the 6 mL of copepods group had a substantial difference from the control group. This data supports the claim that predation of Microcystis aeruginosa by Cyclops copepods does indeed cause increased cyanobacteria growth in the long run.

Location

Neville 221

Start Date

4-14-2018 11:30 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 11:30 AM

The effect of Cyclops copepod predation on the promotion of growth within Microcystis aeruginosa populations through chemical signaling

Neville 221

Harmful cyanobacterial blooms are a major threat to the world and need to be studied and researched more carefully. This research is aimed towards finding out if the predation of cyanobacteria actually causes more harm than good. There were three groups of 15 dishes that were all filled with 200 mL of distilled water. Cloth boundaries were made to split each dish in half(side A and side B) and they were hot glued to the glass. Each of the dishes contained 4 mL of Microcystis aeruginosa in both side A and side B. One group of dishes contained 4 mL of Cyclops copepods in side A, another group contained 6 mL of copepods in side A, and the last group contained no copepods at all. Five cyanobacteria diameters were measured and recorded from each dish over the course of four days. An ANOVA [F(2, 177)= 84.10, p<0.001] indicates there was a significant difference between the amount of copepods added and the cyanobacteria cell diameters. The 4 mL of copepods group had a noticeably larger average cyanobacteria diameter than the control group and the 6 mL of copepods group had a substantial difference from the control group. This data supports the claim that predation of Microcystis aeruginosa by Cyclops copepods does indeed cause increased cyanobacteria growth in the long run.