Title

The Use of Verapamil to Maximize P-gp Expression on the Cell Membrane

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Cell and Molecular Biology

Presentation Type

Mentored

Oral Presentation Award

4th Place

Abstract

This research was conducted to develop a potential treatment for Alzheimer’s disease. P-glycoprotein has been shown to transport amyloid beta aggregates that are thought to be responsible for the neurotoxicity in Alzheimer’s disease. We hypothesized that treatment with Verapamil can alter P-glycoprotein expression and an increase in P-glycoprotein present on the cell membrane would increase the transport of amyloid beta aggregates. This would slow and potentially stop the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. To test this hypothesis, Madin Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells were grown, treated with various concentrations of Verapamil, and then fixed and stained. The images were analyzed to determine the effect of Verapamil on the expression of P-glycoprotein on the cell membrane. The results show that Verapamil increases P-glycoprotein expression with an inverse dose dependency. The inverse dose dependency was unexpected and has not been reported previously.

Location

Neville theater

Start Date

4-14-2018 10:00 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 10:00 AM

The Use of Verapamil to Maximize P-gp Expression on the Cell Membrane

Neville theater

This research was conducted to develop a potential treatment for Alzheimer’s disease. P-glycoprotein has been shown to transport amyloid beta aggregates that are thought to be responsible for the neurotoxicity in Alzheimer’s disease. We hypothesized that treatment with Verapamil can alter P-glycoprotein expression and an increase in P-glycoprotein present on the cell membrane would increase the transport of amyloid beta aggregates. This would slow and potentially stop the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. To test this hypothesis, Madin Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells were grown, treated with various concentrations of Verapamil, and then fixed and stained. The images were analyzed to determine the effect of Verapamil on the expression of P-glycoprotein on the cell membrane. The results show that Verapamil increases P-glycoprotein expression with an inverse dose dependency. The inverse dose dependency was unexpected and has not been reported previously.