Title

The mechanical study of hydrogels and an organogel as potential synthetic brain phantom

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Mentored

Written Paper Award

1st Place

Abstract

The brain is an intricate organ, composed of white matter, gray matter, blood vessels, nerves, and dura matter. The study and surgical intervention of the brain is limited by the availability of cadavers for research and experience in the operating room. This work proposes the use of a 3D phantom brain tissue to create a realistic model of the brain with accurate mechanical properties of the brain. In particular, this study assess the mechanical properties of synthetic materials and porcine brain and tests properties of stress, strain, relaxation, and adhesion. Gelatin-based hydrogels and oil-based emulsions served as the two candidates for a brain substitute material. Results demonstrate that 1.7% Chromium 3.5% Gelatin was more similar to porcine brain in compression properties as shown by compression stress strain analysis and the other properties. This study has found a viable material substitute for the fabrication of a 3D brain phantom that aims to improve the learning experience of medical students and the preoperative planning of surgeons.

Location

Neville 109

Start Date

4-14-2018 9:30 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 9:30 AM

The mechanical study of hydrogels and an organogel as potential synthetic brain phantom

Neville 109

The brain is an intricate organ, composed of white matter, gray matter, blood vessels, nerves, and dura matter. The study and surgical intervention of the brain is limited by the availability of cadavers for research and experience in the operating room. This work proposes the use of a 3D phantom brain tissue to create a realistic model of the brain with accurate mechanical properties of the brain. In particular, this study assess the mechanical properties of synthetic materials and porcine brain and tests properties of stress, strain, relaxation, and adhesion. Gelatin-based hydrogels and oil-based emulsions served as the two candidates for a brain substitute material. Results demonstrate that 1.7% Chromium 3.5% Gelatin was more similar to porcine brain in compression properties as shown by compression stress strain analysis and the other properties. This study has found a viable material substitute for the fabrication of a 3D brain phantom that aims to improve the learning experience of medical students and the preoperative planning of surgeons.