Title

The Effect of Sensory Implementations on Information Retained From Virtual Reality Media

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Computer Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Oral Presentation Award

1st Place

Written Paper Award

2nd Place

Abstract

This paper examines the addition of sensory implementations into virtual reality (VR) applications and their effect on the educational value of that application. The purpose of this experiment was to test how sensory implementations affect information retention and to find which sensory implementation are most beneficial to information retention. A group of 20 participants utilized 4 different apps over the course of this experiment to learn about a subject. They were then assessed using a short, 6 question follow-up quiz that included questions about the subject. Later on, the participants were sent a post-experimentation survey to measure the quality of their experience. It was believed that if trimodal (audio, visual, and haptic) feedback was implemented, the user’s sense of presence within the virtual reality space would be the highest and the students would produce higher results on the post-assessment. Also, if asked which implementation increased their educational experience most, more participants would respond “visual”.

Location

Founders Hall 140 B

Start Date

3-30-2019 10:15 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 30th, 10:15 AM

The Effect of Sensory Implementations on Information Retained From Virtual Reality Media

Founders Hall 140 B

This paper examines the addition of sensory implementations into virtual reality (VR) applications and their effect on the educational value of that application. The purpose of this experiment was to test how sensory implementations affect information retention and to find which sensory implementation are most beneficial to information retention. A group of 20 participants utilized 4 different apps over the course of this experiment to learn about a subject. They were then assessed using a short, 6 question follow-up quiz that included questions about the subject. Later on, the participants were sent a post-experimentation survey to measure the quality of their experience. It was believed that if trimodal (audio, visual, and haptic) feedback was implemented, the user’s sense of presence within the virtual reality space would be the highest and the students would produce higher results on the post-assessment. Also, if asked which implementation increased their educational experience most, more participants would respond “visual”.