Title

The Effect of Varied Levels of Salinity on Chlorophyll A Levels In Caulerpa Sertularioides

Author(s)

Frank BoysiaFollow

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Botany

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Caulerpa Sertularioides is an invasive seaweed native to regions near the Mediterranean Sea. It is used as a staple in many sushi dishes and in aquariums as a nitrate absorber. The purpose of this experiment was to find which salinity concentration that would provide the most beneficial change in chlorophyll A and B Concentrations for the ferns in a 1-month time span. It was predicted that the ferns in the 35 ppt salinity concentration would have the most beneficial chlorophyll level in comparison to the other groups because the average salinity of the Mediterranean Sea is 35. 30 ferns were planted in each treatment of 30ppt water, 35 ppt water, and 40 ppt water. The water treatment with 35 ppt was used as the control and the ferns were measured in daily intervals so a total of 30 measurements were taken per salinity level. After the 2 week experiment, the hypothesis was supported because the plants that were planted in the 35 g/L salinity had the closest absorbance value to 0. The plants in the 40 g/L water constantly increased throughout the experiment and the plants in the 30 g/L increased during the first week but decreased during the second week. This decrease could be due to the heightened adaptiveness of the plant. A one-way ANOVA was run on the end of the second-week data and it yielded a p-value of <.00001 which meant that there was a significant difference between the salinity concentrations.

Location

Founders Hall 111 B

Start Date

3-30-2019 9:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 30th, 9:45 AM

The Effect of Varied Levels of Salinity on Chlorophyll A Levels In Caulerpa Sertularioides

Founders Hall 111 B

Caulerpa Sertularioides is an invasive seaweed native to regions near the Mediterranean Sea. It is used as a staple in many sushi dishes and in aquariums as a nitrate absorber. The purpose of this experiment was to find which salinity concentration that would provide the most beneficial change in chlorophyll A and B Concentrations for the ferns in a 1-month time span. It was predicted that the ferns in the 35 ppt salinity concentration would have the most beneficial chlorophyll level in comparison to the other groups because the average salinity of the Mediterranean Sea is 35. 30 ferns were planted in each treatment of 30ppt water, 35 ppt water, and 40 ppt water. The water treatment with 35 ppt was used as the control and the ferns were measured in daily intervals so a total of 30 measurements were taken per salinity level. After the 2 week experiment, the hypothesis was supported because the plants that were planted in the 35 g/L salinity had the closest absorbance value to 0. The plants in the 40 g/L water constantly increased throughout the experiment and the plants in the 30 g/L increased during the first week but decreased during the second week. This decrease could be due to the heightened adaptiveness of the plant. A one-way ANOVA was run on the end of the second-week data and it yielded a p-value of <.00001 which meant that there was a significant difference between the salinity concentrations.