Title

Can People Accurately Predict Their Test Scores Based on Previous Scores?

Author(s)

Will Koon

School Name

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Grade Level

9th Grade

Presentation Topic

Psychology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

This study was carried out to determine what the effect of prior scores on assessments has on future scores. If order to conduct this study, I obtained permission from AssessmentDay to use two of their logical reasoning assessments. 28 students were gathered; they first took a survey describing what they expected to receive on the 1st assessment prior to taking it. They then took the 1st assessment. Then, after grading the assessments, they were returned to the students with some having false scores on them; 7 received their true score, 7 received a score 2 points lower, 7 received a score 2 points higher, and 7 did not receive their scores at all. After receiving their scores, the subjects took a second survey predicting what they expected to receive on the 2nd assessment prior to taking it. They then took the 2nd assessment. After grading 2nd assessments, the data was analyzed. After analyzing the data, I found that the people who didn't receive their score back did not seem to have much of a relationship with each other; 4 received similar scores, 2 received lower scores, and 2 received higher scores. The group that received their actual scores for the 1st assessment had about the same success on the 2nd assessment. The group that received a higher score on their first assessment tended to do better on the second assessment. The group that received a lower score on their first assessment also had scores which were all over the place.

Location

Furman Hall 208

Start Date

3-28-2020 12:15 PM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 12:15 PM

Can People Accurately Predict Their Test Scores Based on Previous Scores?

Furman Hall 208

This study was carried out to determine what the effect of prior scores on assessments has on future scores. If order to conduct this study, I obtained permission from AssessmentDay to use two of their logical reasoning assessments. 28 students were gathered; they first took a survey describing what they expected to receive on the 1st assessment prior to taking it. They then took the 1st assessment. Then, after grading the assessments, they were returned to the students with some having false scores on them; 7 received their true score, 7 received a score 2 points lower, 7 received a score 2 points higher, and 7 did not receive their scores at all. After receiving their scores, the subjects took a second survey predicting what they expected to receive on the 2nd assessment prior to taking it. They then took the 2nd assessment. After grading 2nd assessments, the data was analyzed. After analyzing the data, I found that the people who didn't receive their score back did not seem to have much of a relationship with each other; 4 received similar scores, 2 received lower scores, and 2 received higher scores. The group that received their actual scores for the 1st assessment had about the same success on the 2nd assessment. The group that received a higher score on their first assessment tended to do better on the second assessment. The group that received a lower score on their first assessment also had scores which were all over the place.