Title

The Effect of Bacterial and Artificial Bonding Agents on the Integrity of Concrete

Author(s)

Jonathan Caruso

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Concrete is a very commonly used construction material that is vulnerable to cracking and fractures over time. Replacing concrete in buildings and foundations can be very expensive and risks causing further damage to the building. A safer and more efficient way of sealing concrete to make it stronger can make buildings safer, and last longer. Current bonding agents are expensive in large quantities and are possibly dangerous to the environment. Finding an organic bonding agent may be the solution to the problem. In this experiment, a latex bonding agent was compared to Bacillus pseudofirmus. Larger cracks are typically filled with a concrete plaster but a liquid adhesive can also help prevent future cracks. Previous research has confirmed that the bacteria Bacillus pseudofirmus is also a feasible bonding agent (Jonkers, Thijssen, Muyzer, Copuroglu, Schlangen, 2008). This bacteria was compared to other industrial bonding agents to determine which works better at improving the integrity of concrete. It is hypothesized that Bacillus pseudofirmus will be more effective at sealing cracks than the artificial bonding agents. 60 concrete bars and 60 concrete cylinders were fabricated. There were four treatment groups that were tested for their strength. The bars were put through a flexural test and the cylinders, a compression test. The Results showed that the bacterial bonding agent was not more effective than the commercial bonding agents and that it required much more attention in order for the bacteria to replicate. This means that currently a commercial bonding agent is more effective at sealing concrete than the bacteria Bacillus pseudofirmus.

Location

John's Hall 107

Start Date

3-28-2020 8:30 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 8:30 AM

The Effect of Bacterial and Artificial Bonding Agents on the Integrity of Concrete

John's Hall 107

Concrete is a very commonly used construction material that is vulnerable to cracking and fractures over time. Replacing concrete in buildings and foundations can be very expensive and risks causing further damage to the building. A safer and more efficient way of sealing concrete to make it stronger can make buildings safer, and last longer. Current bonding agents are expensive in large quantities and are possibly dangerous to the environment. Finding an organic bonding agent may be the solution to the problem. In this experiment, a latex bonding agent was compared to Bacillus pseudofirmus. Larger cracks are typically filled with a concrete plaster but a liquid adhesive can also help prevent future cracks. Previous research has confirmed that the bacteria Bacillus pseudofirmus is also a feasible bonding agent (Jonkers, Thijssen, Muyzer, Copuroglu, Schlangen, 2008). This bacteria was compared to other industrial bonding agents to determine which works better at improving the integrity of concrete. It is hypothesized that Bacillus pseudofirmus will be more effective at sealing cracks than the artificial bonding agents. 60 concrete bars and 60 concrete cylinders were fabricated. There were four treatment groups that were tested for their strength. The bars were put through a flexural test and the cylinders, a compression test. The Results showed that the bacterial bonding agent was not more effective than the commercial bonding agents and that it required much more attention in order for the bacteria to replicate. This means that currently a commercial bonding agent is more effective at sealing concrete than the bacteria Bacillus pseudofirmus.