Title

Implementing DNA Origami Dynamic Nano-Structures Into the Extracellular Matrix to Measure Interstitial Shear Force

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science & Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

Implementation of dynamic nano structures (NanoDyn) in the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) can help further the research on tumors metastasis within the ECM. Additional research of cell metastasis will improve our understanding of how and where tumors will grow, which is the first step to improving cancer treatments. Collagen is used as the environment in which the devices are placed. Peptides are used to bind the devices to the collagen. Using confocal microscopy, the NanoDyn were imaged. Single molecule microscopy was used to measure the effects of pressure on the NanoDyn devices. From the confocal, we found that between 51 degrees Celsius and 60 degrees Celsius, these devices bind best to collagen. Using C1 and C2 devices we found that they open (>180 degrees) under 50 & 100ul of pressure. These results indicate that we are able to connect these devices to the ECM and they were able to measure different pressures. The data collected can be used to help cancer researchers understand how intestinal force aids to tumor metastasis. The NanoDyn would continue to assist cancer research and help find an eventual cure.

Location

Johns Hall 109

Start Date

3-28-2020 9:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 28th, 9:45 AM

Implementing DNA Origami Dynamic Nano-Structures Into the Extracellular Matrix to Measure Interstitial Shear Force

Johns Hall 109

Implementation of dynamic nano structures (NanoDyn) in the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) can help further the research on tumors metastasis within the ECM. Additional research of cell metastasis will improve our understanding of how and where tumors will grow, which is the first step to improving cancer treatments. Collagen is used as the environment in which the devices are placed. Peptides are used to bind the devices to the collagen. Using confocal microscopy, the NanoDyn were imaged. Single molecule microscopy was used to measure the effects of pressure on the NanoDyn devices. From the confocal, we found that between 51 degrees Celsius and 60 degrees Celsius, these devices bind best to collagen. Using C1 and C2 devices we found that they open (>180 degrees) under 50 & 100ul of pressure. These results indicate that we are able to connect these devices to the ECM and they were able to measure different pressures. The data collected can be used to help cancer researchers understand how intestinal force aids to tumor metastasis. The NanoDyn would continue to assist cancer research and help find an eventual cure.