Title

Computational Modeling of Graphene Grain Boundaries

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

Graphene is such an important material for a variety of reasons, it’s the only man-made 2D object, Its stronger than steel, and lighter than aluminum. In the world of Mechanical engineering, Graphene is quite a hot topic. Dr. Enrique Martinez introduced us to a lot of research about Graphene, so much so that we realized how important it is. Knowing how important it is, these factors led us to want to do our own research. Using hardware (Palmetto) and software (LAMMPS) provided by Clemson, we were able to run simulations to test the true strengths of Graphene. We put sheets of graphene (one with defects, and one without) under various degrees of stress and this is what we found. After putting the sheets under various levels of stress and temperature, we found that a perfect sheet of graphene would break under about 300k bars of stress and 3000 K. A sheet with two defects in opposite corners, however, would break under much less stress, at about 125k bars and 3000 K. Overall, these results further the notion that graphene is insanely strong and has so many practical uses. Think about lightweight wings on an airplane that would reduce fuel, and likewise reduce emissions. Reasons like this are why graphene is the future, and why we need to keep testing it.

Location

HSS 113

Start Date

4-2-2022 9:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

Yes

COinS
 
Apr 2nd, 9:45 AM

Computational Modeling of Graphene Grain Boundaries

HSS 113

Graphene is such an important material for a variety of reasons, it’s the only man-made 2D object, Its stronger than steel, and lighter than aluminum. In the world of Mechanical engineering, Graphene is quite a hot topic. Dr. Enrique Martinez introduced us to a lot of research about Graphene, so much so that we realized how important it is. Knowing how important it is, these factors led us to want to do our own research. Using hardware (Palmetto) and software (LAMMPS) provided by Clemson, we were able to run simulations to test the true strengths of Graphene. We put sheets of graphene (one with defects, and one without) under various degrees of stress and this is what we found. After putting the sheets under various levels of stress and temperature, we found that a perfect sheet of graphene would break under about 300k bars of stress and 3000 K. A sheet with two defects in opposite corners, however, would break under much less stress, at about 125k bars and 3000 K. Overall, these results further the notion that graphene is insanely strong and has so many practical uses. Think about lightweight wings on an airplane that would reduce fuel, and likewise reduce emissions. Reasons like this are why graphene is the future, and why we need to keep testing it.