Title

The Effect of Resveratrol on the Bioluminescence of Pyrocystis fusiformis and Pyrocystis lunula

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Harmful algal blooms (HABs), formed by toxic phytoplankton like dinoflagellates, cause adverse health and environmental issues that kill people and animals. Resveratrol is a nutrient commonly found in red wine with anti-inflammatory properties that help prevent certain illnesses, such as cardiovascular disease. While some studies have tested how resveratrol works symbiotically with certain aquatic animals, none have researched its effect on protists like dinoflagellates. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of resveratrol on Pyrocystis fusiformis and Pyrocystis lunula, two bioluminescent dinoflagellate species. It was hypothesized that a higher concentration (2.3 mg/L) of resveratrol would result in more bioluminescence after 72 hours than the lower concentration (1.1 mg/L). A higher bioluminescence rate indicates a disturbance within their environment, leading to a period of low reproduction as conditions are unfavorable for growth. 3 mL of P. fusiformis and P. lunula were transferred to Petri dishes, and 2 mL of a resveratrol concentration was added. Bioluminescence was measured at 24, 48, and 72 hours using spectrophotometry. A one-way ANOVA found that time did not influence bioluminescence while one concentration of resveratrol (0, 1.1, and 2.3 mg/L) did (F(2, 285) = 109.81, p < .001); therefore, a post hoc Tukey test was conducted, which determined that 2.3 mg/L was statistically significant. The results of this experiment suggest that a 2.3 mg/L resveratrol concentration can effectively lower the bioluminescence of P. fusiformis and P. lunula regardless of the time, meaning that resveratrol has the potential to decrease HABs.

Location

HSS 215

Start Date

4-2-2022 11:30 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Apr 2nd, 11:30 AM

The Effect of Resveratrol on the Bioluminescence of Pyrocystis fusiformis and Pyrocystis lunula

HSS 215

Harmful algal blooms (HABs), formed by toxic phytoplankton like dinoflagellates, cause adverse health and environmental issues that kill people and animals. Resveratrol is a nutrient commonly found in red wine with anti-inflammatory properties that help prevent certain illnesses, such as cardiovascular disease. While some studies have tested how resveratrol works symbiotically with certain aquatic animals, none have researched its effect on protists like dinoflagellates. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of resveratrol on Pyrocystis fusiformis and Pyrocystis lunula, two bioluminescent dinoflagellate species. It was hypothesized that a higher concentration (2.3 mg/L) of resveratrol would result in more bioluminescence after 72 hours than the lower concentration (1.1 mg/L). A higher bioluminescence rate indicates a disturbance within their environment, leading to a period of low reproduction as conditions are unfavorable for growth. 3 mL of P. fusiformis and P. lunula were transferred to Petri dishes, and 2 mL of a resveratrol concentration was added. Bioluminescence was measured at 24, 48, and 72 hours using spectrophotometry. A one-way ANOVA found that time did not influence bioluminescence while one concentration of resveratrol (0, 1.1, and 2.3 mg/L) did (F(2, 285) = 109.81, p < .001); therefore, a post hoc Tukey test was conducted, which determined that 2.3 mg/L was statistically significant. The results of this experiment suggest that a 2.3 mg/L resveratrol concentration can effectively lower the bioluminescence of P. fusiformis and P. lunula regardless of the time, meaning that resveratrol has the potential to decrease HABs.