Article Title

No Title.

Authors

Newspaper Title

Ohio State Journal

Publication Date

5-27-1856

Publication Place

Columbus,Ohio

Event Topic

Sumner Caning

Political Party

Republican

Region

free state

Quote

[Pointing Finger] The Louisville Journal speaks of the disgraceful outrage in the Senate chamber in a spirit of just condemnation, although it thinks Mr. Sumner ought to be punished "for his incendiary harangues."

Document Type

Article (Journal or Newsletter)

Full Text Transcription

[Pointing Finger] The Louisville Journal speaks of the disgraceful outrage in the Senate chamber in a spirit of just condemnation, although it thinks Mr. Sumner ought to be punished "for his incendiary harangues." If bludgeons rather than arguments are to be used in the Senate, the Journal presumes "Massachusetts might find many a bully within her borders who could make short work with Mr. Brooks." After alluding to the fact that there has long existed a grudge between South-Carolina andMassachusetts, ever since in fact the expulsion of Judge Hoar from Charleston, in which the most offensive language has come from the champions of South-Carolina, the editor of the Journal tells the following anecdote in point:

"We happened to be in the Senate Chamber near the close of the last session of Congress during one of the night discussions of all manner of slavery questions. Judge Butler, who is really a gentleman of many fine and generous personal qualities, had become exceedingly elated from frequent visits to the Senatorial Restaurant. Sumner was making a severe speech that evidently had reference to the forcible expulsion of Mr. Hoar, a venerable citizen of Massachusetts, from the limits of South-Carolina, but he did not mention South-Carolina's name. Mr. Butler interrupted him by asking in a fierce tone, "does he mean South-Carolina?" Sumner proceeded without noticing the interruption. "I demand," exclaimed Butler, starting again to his feet, "whether he means South-Carolina; for, if he does, let him say so, and I will give him something to make him remember me and South-Carolina as long as he lives." Sumner still proceeded quite imperturbably, bestowing no attention upon his excited opponent just in front of him. "Does he mean South-Carolina? ejaculated Butler for the third time. "Yes, I do mean South-Carolina," thundered Sumner, with more spirit than we had thought an abolitionist could possess. He finished his speech without any further interruption, and Butler rose to reply, but the fine old South-Carolina gentleman was too far gone to be half equal to the tremendous occasion."

The Journal thinks that Senator Butler, "who is quite as fiery-hearted as he is white-headed," will not thank any younger man for taking his quarrel off his hands; and advises the prompt expulsion of Brooks by the House, as a duty both to itself and the Senate, and to the patriotic portion of the people of the United States. It may well be said that when the freedom of debate is gone, the liberties of the country hang by a rotten thread.

Edited/Proofed by

Entered by Lloyd Benson. Proofed by Katie DeLong

Identifier

ohsjsu560527a

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[Pointing Finger] The Louisville Journal speaks of the disgraceful outrage in the Senate chamber in a spirit of just condemnation, although it thinks Mr. Sumner ought to be punished "for his incendiary harangues."