Article Title

Wade in the Senate.--

Authors

Newspaper Title

Ohio State Journal

Publication Date

5-31-1856

Publication Place

Columbus,Ohio

Event Topic

Sumner Caning

Political Party

Republican

Region

free state

Quote

The passage on the floor of the Senate, in which Mr. Butler bore himself so courteously toward Mr. Wilson, and in which Mr. Toombs approved of mob law in regulating debate, has been sketched in our telegraphic dispatches.

Document Type

Article (Journal or Newsletter)

Full Text Transcription

The passage on the floor of the Senate, in which Mr. Butler bore himself so courteously toward Mr. Wilson, and in which Mr. Toombs approved of mob law in regulating debate, has been sketched in our telegraphic dispatches. The part our Senator took in that debate was also sketched, but it will be better understood by the following more full report of what he did say:

Mr. Wade said it was impossible for him to sit still and hear such principles avowed as he had heard on this occasion. As to the facts in reference to the assault he knew nothing about them, and had nothing to say on that point. He was here in a pretty lean minority -- not more than about one-fifth of the Senate entertaining opinions similar to his. But when he heard it stated that on this floor an assassin-like, cowardly attack had been made upon a man unarmed and having no power to defend himself, and that he had been stricken down and almost murdered, and then heard a Senator avow that he approved such conduct, it became a matter of some interest and importance to all members of this body, and especially the minority. A brave man could not defend himself against such an attack as this, and might be overpowered by numbers; but overpowered or not, live or die, I will vindicate the rights of liberty of debate and the freedom of discussion so long as I live. If the principle announced here is to prevail, let us come armed for the combat. Although you are four to one, I am here to meet you. A man can die in no better cause than in vindication of the rights of debate on this floor. If these are the principles that are to be approved by a majority, and become part and parcel of the law of Congress, let it be understood.

The telegraph also informs us that Brooks has tendered a challenge to Mr. Wilson for language used by him on the same occasion. But Mr. Wilson very promptly and properly told him he should recognize him only as a bully and a blackguard, and should meet violence with violence. So the matter stands. Brooks is now the challenged party, but we shall hear of no more fighting, for the plain reason that the cowards know that they will be promptly met. That's as it should be.

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Entered by Lloyd Benson. Proofed by Katie DeLong

Identifier

ohsjsu560531b

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Wade in the Senate.--

The passage on the floor of the Senate, in which Mr. Butler bore himself so courteously toward Mr. Wilson, and in which Mr. Toombs approved of mob law in regulating debate, has been sketched in our telegraphic dispatches.