Article Title

THE BROOKS MEETING.

Authors

Newspaper Title

Laurensville Herald

Publication Date

6-6-1859

Publication Place

Laurensville,South Carolina

Event Topic

Sumner Caning

Political Party

Democratic

Region

slave state

Quote

The first has been struck, which will be felt keener and longer than all the arguments and warnings ever used in Congress by Southern members

Document Type

Article (Journal or Newsletter)

Full Text Transcription

In another column will be found the proceedings of a meeting held at this place on Monday last, by the constituents of P. S. Brooks in Laurens District. The Court House was filled to overflowing with the most staunch, discreet and pure men of the District, who evinced an enthusiasm and interest in the matter on which they assembled to consider, beyond anything we have witnessed in Laurens before. The meeting was harmonious and dignified, and it must be a source of gratification to Col. Brooks to know that while he is reviled, traduced and harassed by letters from his enemies, and the proceedings of the many meetings held by them at the North, here, among the people whom he represents in Congress, but one feeling pervades, and that feeling most unequivocally endorses the act of caning Sumner. To his constituents alone must he look for the sanction of his acts against their enemies, and if they approve them, it must be evident he is a true and faithful representative of their wishes and opinions.

The first blow has been struck, which will be felt keener and longer than all the arguments and warnings ever used in Congress by Southern members, and, in our opinion, that blow is pregnant with results, which will be developed in hastening the crisis to which we had before been more slowly approaching. Vituperative and libellous speaking in Congress has received a check which will weaken the arguments of our enemies more than anything else; and if the precedeent of Mr. Brooks be adopted by the whole Southern delegation, as their rule and course of conduct towards those who cannot, by courtesy and arguments of words, be made to respect them and the people they represent, our opinion is, Congress will be freed from those unjust and unholy excitements which have of late years existed there, caused by the violent and mad ravings of those who prefer to pander to the prejudices of the masses than to allow reason, justice and dignity, to govern their acts and associations. It has been a favorite argument that "while we continue in the Union, let us act with our sister States, in all their modes of governments;" so, we say, while we are in the Union, let us demand that courtesy and justice to our Representatives and State which is awarded to our sister States of the Confederacy.

Edited/Proofed by

Entered by and proofed by Lloyd Benson.

Identifier

sclhsu560606a

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THE BROOKS MEETING.

The first has been struck, which will be felt keener and longer than all the arguments and warnings ever used in Congress by Southern members