Article Title

A Good Deal of Truth.

Authors

Newspaper Title

New-Orleans Bee

Publication Date

5-20-1854

Publication Place

New Orleans,Louisiana

Event Topic

Nebraska Bill (Jan-May 1854)

Political Party

Whig

Region

slave state

Quote

There is a great deal of truth in the following article, which we extract from the New York Tribune, of the 14th inst., and right angry are we at being compelled to admit it.

Document Type

Article (Journal or Newsletter)

Full Text Transcription

There is a great deal of truth in the following article, which we extract from the New York Tribune, of the 14th inst., and right angry are we at being compelled to admit it. It is also striking and suggestive in many respects, and should arrest the profound attention of slaveholders in all of the Southern States:

"We challenge the curious annals of history for a more striking progressive change in the sentiment of a nation than that which has taken place in regard to Abolition, pure and simple, in the free States of America. A few years ago and the name of Abolitionism was identified with social outlawry. Southern States put a price on the head of Garrison; Southern Post offices opened letters and papers; and Committees of Northern Safety-men burned Abolition journals by the heap; mobs drove the emancipation apostle from Baltimore -- burned down a Liberty-Hall in Philadelphia -- shot down Lovejoy for printing and speaking democracy -- and everywhere persecuted the name, fame and persons of the Abolitionists. Three years ago a mob headed by Isaiah Rynders, broke up their meeting at the Tabernacle, and fairly pursued them from the city. Two years ago they could not obtain here a place to assemble in, and were obliged to go to Syracuse to hold their Anniversary. But now all this is changed. They are welcomed to one of the largest and handsomest churches in New York, and for the past two days their discussions alone have not only been entirely undisturbed, but have been attended by crowded and sympathetic audiences of the most respectable people. Even conservatism and moderation now listen without a shock to the bold utterances of these quandom fanatics. Such is the effect produced by the conviction which is now gaining complete possession of the public mind of the North, that the South is resolved to extend the area of Slavery at whatever risk. This great change has been wrought by the Nebraska bill, and as yet we are only at the beginning.Garrison, Phillips, and their compeers could not have made so many Abolitionists and Disunionists in half a century, as Pierce, Douglas, Badger and Clayton have made in three months.

For some months previous to the introduction of the Nebraska Bill, the abolitionists of the North were becoming stiller and stiller, until nothing, comparatively speaking, was heard of them. They were evidently losing influence and popularity. The fuel wherewith to keep alive the fires of fanaticism had well nigh given out. With the exception of here and there a fugitive slave case -- perfect god sends to them -- they had nothing to go upon. Their occupation, if not gone like Othello's, was going rapidly. -- The public mind was re-adjusting itself, and the people were beginning to see that all compromises were infinitely preferable to a dissolution of the confederacy -- that the value of the Union was far beyond the reach of human calculation.

It was in this auspicious condition of public feeling that Senator Douglas, in order to advance his prospects for the Presidency, as he hoped, saw fit to hurl this Nebraska firebrand upon the country, to re-awaken the sectional feeling that was happily slumbering, and to re-furnish with arms the fanatics of the North, so that they might more effectually war upon the South, the Constitution and the Union! All of this the Nebraska bill has done. And then it proposed to do no practical good. Its most important principle consists only of a re-affirmation of what already exists. The main principle of the bill is correct in the abstract, but is wholly a barren one to us of the South. Slavery would never go to Kansas or Nebraska were there ten thousand laws in existence expressly authorizing it.-- But for abolitionism there is little doubt slavery would have been abolished in Missouri ere this. The upper portion of that State is much too far North.

So here is a great and injurious excitement, at least in one section of the Union, got up to affect no national purpose, or subserve any patriotic national end. Senator Douglas is to be elected to the Presidency by re-agitating the slavery question. That is the sum and substance of the whole movement. Here we would suggest to the slaveholders of the South, that their negro property is worth about one thousand millions of dollars. Is it safe to make that vast interest a stepping stone by which demagogues can reach the Presidency? We think not. If they do not rebuke Douglas, and frown upon all such attempts hereafter, the security of their property, and consequently its value, will be materially impaired before the expiration of many years.

Not only has this Nebraska Bill stimulated all abolitionism to fresh and fierce assaults upon the South and the Constitution, not only has it supplied them with the means to do mischief, but it has alienated thousands of conservative men from us who stood unflinchingly by the Union in 1850. This is the worst part of the business -- the part most deeply to be deplored. Well may Horace Greeley exultingly proclaim: "Garrison, Phillips, and all their compeers, could not have made so many Abolitionists and Disunionists in half a century, as Pierce, Douglas, Badger and Clayton have made in three months." Greeley is correct. Pierce and Douglas have doubled the number of Abolitionists and quintupled their respectability, which is most to be dreaded. The Southern people are vastly indebted to them for this, and should seek the first opportunity for making payment. A few more such friends, a few more such champions and we will be in the condition of Pyrrius just after he had won a great battle. Exclaimed the Epirote Monarch: "One more such victory and I'm ruined." A few more such measures as the Nebraska bill and a few more such friends such as Pierce, Douglas [amp;] Co., will drive from us the conservative men of the North and hand over that section to the control of the Abolitionists, whereupon a dissolution of the Union is inevitable. Here is a contingency, and a very probable one, that should not be blinked by the Southern people.

Edited/Proofed by

Entered by Lloyd Benson. Proofed by Katie DeLong

Identifier

lanbkn540520a

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A Good Deal of Truth.

There is a great deal of truth in the following article, which we extract from the New York Tribune, of the 14th inst., and right angry are we at being compelled to admit it.