Authors

Newspaper Title

Sun

Publication Date

5-28-1856

Publication Place

Baltimore,Maryland

Event Topic

Sumner Caning

Political Party

American

Region

slave state

Quote

Let the root of the evil be aimed at, by a prompt and determined "call to order" immediately on the first digression from the proper parliamentary discourse, and we may then escape any more such scenes as disgrace the body and tend to provoke violence.

Document Type

Article (Journal or Newsletter)

Full Text Transcription

-- It will be seen by our reports that the subject of the late assault by Mr. Brooks, of S. C.., upon Senator Sumner, in the Senate Chamber, was the subject of remark in that body yesterday -- and that some warm words grew out of it between Messrs. Toombs, of Ga., and Wade, of Ohio.-- It is to be hoped that by the time the subject shall come up regularly before the Senate, gentlemen will have got sufficiently cool to deal with it in a discreet, dignified, yet none the less firm manner. The presiding officer, it seems to us, however, has the whole matter of the decorum of the body over which he presides pretty much in his own keeping. Let the root of the evil be aimed at, by a prompt and determined "call to order" immediately on the first digression from the proper parliamentary discourse, and we may then escape any more such scenes as disgrace the body and tend to provoke violence. Senator Butler, S. C.., re-appeared in his seat yesterday, and promises to take due and courteous notice of the resolves of theMassachusetts Legislature in reference to Mr. Sumner and the assault upon him, growing out of Mr. S.'s remarks upon Mr. B. and his State, when they shall be presented to the Senate.

Edited/Proofed by

Entered by Lloyd Benson. Proofed by James Cash

Identifier

mdbssu560528a

Rights

This item is in the public domain, and can be used by anyone without restriction.

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Congress and the Sumner Assault.

Let the root of the evil be aimed at, by a prompt and determined "call to order" immediately on the first digression from the proper parliamentary discourse, and we may then escape any more such scenes as disgrace the body and tend to provoke violence.