Authors

Newspaper Title

Sun

Publication Date

5-15-1856

Publication Place

Baltimore,Maryland

Event Topic

Sumner Caning

Political Party

American

Region

slave state

Quote

These two gentlemen have all at once become prominent characters and objects of public sympathy in their respective sections of country.

Document Type

Article (Journal or Newsletter)

Full Text Transcription

These two gentlemen have all at once become prominent characters and objects of public sympathy in their respective sections of country. We have already recorded the doings of many of the friends of Mr. Sumner. They have, as a general thing, confined themselves to expressions of sympathy for Mr. Sumner and denunciations of the conduct of Mr. Brooks. The friends of the latter, however, do not seem disposed to stop at resolutions of commendation, but are determined to evince their feelings in a more substantial manner.-- The students of the University of Virginia, it is stated, have held a meeting and resolved to present him with a heavy gold-braided cane, suitably inscribed.

At Columbia, S. C., a handsome sum, headed by a subscription from the Governor of the State, has been subscribed, in order to procure and present to him a splendid silver pitcher and goblet, besides a handsome cane. They are to be taken to Washington by a delegation of South Carolinians. At Charleston similar testimonials have been ordered by the friends of Mr. B., and the cane, it is said, is to bear the inscription, "Hit him again".

At Newberry, S. C., a meeting of citizens have voted him a gold-headed cane, and various other meetings, for a similar purpose, have been called in that State. Reflecting men generally will regret to see these things. They are likely to keep alive the rancorous and dangerous feeling already existing between two sections of the country, and are, to say the least, in bad taste.

Edited/Proofed by

Entered by Lloyd Benson. Proofed by Beatrice Burton

Identifier

mdbssu560530a

Rights

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Messrs. Brooks and Sumner.

These two gentlemen have all at once become prominent characters and objects of public sympathy in their respective sections of country.