Article Title

Brooks and Sumner.

Authors

Newspaper Title

Mobile Daily Register

Publication Date

6-6-1856

Publication Place

Mobile, Alabama

Event Topic

Sumner Caning

Political Party

Democratic

Region

slave state

Quote

Greeley and his crowd are sharply ridiculous in their remarks, and their attempt to make political capital out of it, is so palpable, as to destroy, in a great measure, the effect of the venom they spit forth.

Document Type

Article (Journal or Newsletter)

Full Text Transcription

indignation meetings are being held throughout Massachusetts particularly, denouncing the proceedings of Mr. Brooks as dastardly &c. greeley and his crowd are sharply ridiculous in their remarks, and their attempt to make political capital out of it, is so palpable, as to destroy, in a great measure, the effect of the venom they spit forth.

the Day Book takes a view of the case which seems perfectly rational to men who are in the habit of resenting insults, as men jealous of their own feelings and right should resent them. it says:

more than six years ago we told the abolitionists that if they intended to carry out their principles they must fight. when the Emigrant Aid Societies began to send their tools to Kansas, we told them that if their object was to establish a colony of negro thieves, under the name of "free state men," on the borders of Missouri for the purpose of keeping out Southerners and destroying slavery, they must fight; and we tell them now if they intend to carry their abolitionism into Congress, and pour forth their disgusting obscenity and abuse of the South in the Senate Chamber, and force their doctrines down Southerners' throats, they must fight.. greeley must fight if he stays in Washington and continues to publish his blackguardism about southern men; Sumner must fight, or use a civil tongue. wilson must fight, and Seward must fight, and we all must fight, or let other people's business and family regulations alone.

in South Carolina meetings are being everywhere held expressing the feelings of the people and testifying, by handsome and appropriate testimonials, their sense of the spirit exhibited by Mr. Brooks. even the slaves of Columbia have made a subscription to "present an appropriate token of their regard to him who has made the first practical for their preservation and protection in their rights and enjoyments as the happiest laborers on the face of the earth."

Edited/Proofed by

Entered by Lloyd Benson. Proofed by James Cash

Identifier

almrsu560606a

Rights

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Brooks and Sumner.

Greeley and his crowd are sharply ridiculous in their remarks, and their attempt to make political capital out of it, is so palpable, as to destroy, in a great measure, the effect of the venom they spit forth.